Do all allergies lead to anaphylaxis?

Allergies

Most allergies result in a mild to moderate reaction such as swelling of lips, face, eyes, hives, itchy skin, tingling mouth, abdominal pain and vomiting. These may not necessarily lead to the severe life threatening type of allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis.

Eczema is a type of allergy

Eczema is a type of allergy

 

What Is Anaphylaxis?
Anaphylaxis is a sudden, severe allergic reaction. It's a medical emergency.
Most people with allergies never experience anaphylaxis.

 

In anaphylaxis, within minutes or hours of being exposed to your allergy trigger, your body starts a chain reaction that temporarily widens your blood vessels, which can lower your blood pressure. You may pass out. You may get hives and swelling, especially around your face and throat. You may have trouble breathing, talking, or swallowing.

This is an Epipen.  Not an apple pen, or pineapple pen.

This is an Epipen.  Not an apple pen, or pineapple pen.

 

An injection of epinephrine can delay symptoms, and if you are concerned about anaphylaxis your GP may be able to source out an single-use injection such as the Epipen for you to have handy in your first aid kit.

It is also a good idea to keep your family, friends and co-workers informed of your allergy if severe, as this may serve you well in an emergency.

In summary, allergies can range from mild, moderate to severe, where it is termed anaphylaxis.

They don't tend to cross from mild to severe but each case is different and anyone who suspects they may have an allergy or those who have already been diagnosed please book in for a tailored treatment plan.